Drive by Prayers — St. James the Greater day 6

St. James!
We come to you in eager pilgrimage.
We come as part of a great throng of pilgrims
who through the centuries have come to this place,
where you are pilgrim and host, apostle and patron.
We come to you today
because we are on a common journey.
Place yourself, patron of pilgrims,
at the head of our pilgrimage.
Teach us, apostle and friend of the Lord,
the WAY which leads to him.
Open us, preacher of the Gospel,
to the TRUTH you learned from your Master’s lips.
Give us, witness of the faith,
the strength always to love the LIFE Christ gives.
We pray in Jesus’ name. Amen.

 

Sixth Day James,

One of the Twelve (Matthew 10:1-10)
 
     

Jesus summoned his twelve disciples and gave them authority over unclean spirits to drive them out and to cure every disease and every illness. The names of the twelve apostles are these: first, Simon called Peter, and his brother Andrew; James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James, the son of Alphaeus, and Thaddeus; Simon the Cananean, and Judas Iscariot who betrayed him.

Jesus sent out these twelve after instructing them thus, “Do not go into pagan territory or enter a Samaritan town. Go rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. As you go, make this proclamation: ‘The kingdom of heaven is at hand.’  Cure the sick, raise the dead, cleanse lepers, drive out demons. Without cost you have received; without cost you are to give. Do not take gold or silver or copper for your belts; no sack for the journey, or a second tunic, or sandals, or walking stick. The laborer deserves his keep.”

Reflection


Jesus gives the Apostles a mission.  They are to drive out demons, cure the sick, and proclaim the Kingdom of God:  in other words, their mission is Christ’s mission.

The Apostles have an incredible gift to give:  freedom, healing, life.  But they are to give this gift as freely as they have received it.  They are to travel not like rich people, with horses, chariots, and retinues, but like homeless wanderers:  alone, unarmed, without so much as a change of clothes.  They are given great “authority,” but they must also become totally vulnerable, accepting the hospitality and generosity of others.  They are to be, in short, like Jesus, who “emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, and coming in human likeness.” (Philippians 2)  The Church is called to do the same.

More on St. James the Greater click here.

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